Tag Archives: indiedev

Reactuate Games does World of Tanks

In preparation for an upcoming podcast guest (Craig Fryar), we played World of Tanks, a strategic warring game that involves war tanks from various countries battling for territory. In this “capture the flag” game, people can play in large groups or mano a mano.

Surprisingly, we had a lot of fun just playing one-on-one. And though there was a bit of scheming and spying going on, the excitement shook our office’s walls.

Oh, and I came out undefeated.

Just thought I’d mention that.

Pros

  • Numbers don’t matter. Though we only had two people playing at a time, we all still engaged in the game. Sure, there was a little cheating going on to quicken the battle, but that was part of the fun and camaraderie-building. Game play in a group or alone would probably have a different energy, but the hide and seek aspect of the game is just plain thrilling. No matter how many players you have.
  • Controls are simple. The mouse, WASD, the scroll wheel. That’s basically all you need. Double-tap “R” and your tank gets a little kick. A quick tutorial also shows you all you need to know, like how to hide in a bush or move and shoot at the same time.
  • Realistic movement. Whether your tank is moving up hill, through the lake, or on a dirt road, it’s going to respond realistically. Hills are slow to climb. You have to sludge through water. Every decision affects your game play, making the battle more interesting and life-like.
tanks
worldoftanks.eu

Cons

  • Countdown before battle is so looooonnnnggg.  For thirty seconds, players must sit still, twiddle their thumbs, and question all of their life’s decisions. Seriously. It’s pointless to wait that long. (Although, if you were cool and strategizing with your team, it would make sense to have this time.) But for one-on-one play, it dragged on.
  • Boring stretches. Especially during our play, there were lengths of time where the players couldn’t find one another to even start the fight. And because the tanks move slowly, it can take about an hour for any legit shooting can take place.  (However, we understand this game can be enjoyed methodically and slowly for others.)

Watch the trailer here and tell us what you think.

“Five Minutes of Fame” — Week 10 Recap

Reactuate Games had an influx of visitors last week as the team prepared for bigger and better things happening with Guardian and the company. Among the special guests was Angel Rodriguez, who is now more like an official member of the team, co-hosting the Say Something Smart podcast with me.

Jon Sheppard of Sheppard Studios joined us in the Command Center, too; we listened to his take on our company’s musical interpretation. This theme encompasses some of the adventurous aspects we envision for Reactuate, but it also includes a hint of 8-bit to acknowledge our game development.  You can listen to the entire theme here.

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Ron on TV

Finally, Abilene’s KTAB news station visited us for a live interview last Tuesday. To say that we were as giddy as 12-year-old girls at a One Direction concert is an understatement. Sure, it was only local TV … but hey it’s a start! And as I’ve mentioned before, when you’re in a startup, you should celebrate the small wins. The KTAB crew was super nice and even complimented the cookies we offered (psst…. thanks United Supermarkets).

Task-wise, we got a lot done. Ron, who was on a task-slaying spree, accomplished much, writing and recording a couple of leadership vlogs (more news on those later), creating images for our podcast series, and installing some podcast plugins for our WordPress.

Ron was also our guinea pig for the first episode of Say Something Smart. Angel and I interviewed him and discussed a plethora of topics, including drug testing in professional gaming competitions and the real definition of gamer.  Before we started, I admit that I was a little nervous. The mic seemed to stare into my soul and stifle my voice from sounding natural. But as we eased into the podcast, we all started to mesh a bit more and flow with the conversation. Our first episode will be posted in a few days on our website, YouTube, and on iTunes.

I also sketched out some teaser trailers that we will hopefully create within the next couple of weeks. As of now, we have two visions: one lighthearted and the other … a little less so. We’re excited to finally get some moving video of the game out to the public and interest more people in Guardian.

Screenshot 2015-08-03 11.13.10
Power plant

Katey finished her recreation of the power plant (which now has a smoke feature). She also created some cool icons for the UI. They include simple images, so players will easily understand their function, but they are unique enough to be intriguing and admired as well.

Austin worked more on the UI system and implementing missions. He also put Katey’s icon to use. Buildings can now be placed in the game and rise from nothing upon command thanks to our code artist, too.

icons
Icons for UI

Reactuate Games does Super Smash Bros.

Last Friday, we had a blast playing Super Smash Bros. … and you can’t see it because our screen didn’t record any of it. But we promise it happened.

There was screaming and jeering and vengeful laughing– mostly from me– but everyone seemed to have a good time. And after some intense 4-player action, we talked about the pros and cons of this wildly entertaining game.

Pros:

  • So many characters to choose from! Not only do you have the regulars like Mario, Luigi, and Peach, but you also have Pac-Man, Pokemon characters, and the Wii Fit Trainers. Yes, the lady trainer pulls a yoga move. No, it didn’t do much — but it’s cool as an option anyhow.

    Screenshot 2015-07-27 17.03.18
    smashbros.com
  • Up to 8 people can play. Why would you want 8 to play? To add to the chaos, of course! As the saying goes, the more the merrier. And the more to demolish.
  • Developers still focused on details. If you attack someone with a shield, you’ll get hurt. Even with all the craziness happening, Jigglypuffs flying left and right, it’s nice to know that even these minute details work.

Cons:

  • We still don’t understand the controls. As Ron mentioned, he was just hammering buttons the whole time and played a lot of defense because he, like the rest of us, couldn’t really grasp what the controls specifically did. Nor could we find a tutorial. (But that’s kind of the fun, right?)
  • Controls vary with remote. This may not be a con so much as just an annoyance. We couldn’t help Ron, who had a Wii U gamepad, because our setup was so different. On that note …
  • The wii remote doesn’t have any effect on game play. The movement censor means nothing in this game (at least it didn’t seem like it). I see a missed opportunity.
  • Camera view plays favorites. Sometimes the camera would follow a character to their death besides focusing on the remaining players left on the platform. What gives? This sometimes made it difficult to continue fighting when others were defeated.
ssbyoga
en.wikipedia.org

 

Do you love Super Smash Bros.? Let us know in the comments below, or give us suggestions for our next Play & Learn!

 

 

 

 

Spreading the Word

Marketing is in full-force here at Reactuate Games. With a little over a month until Kickstarter, the team has had idea-fever (it’s a thing), and our marketing to-do list is growing.

One idea that we’re extremely excited about is our new podcast series. Since our first weeks at RG, we’ve aspired to produce a gaming podcast, but we felt too much time would be taken away from other, more important projects. At this stage in our journey, however, it’s vital to collaborate with other gaming-industry influencers, build our community of supporters, and spread the word about our game.

pixels
imdb.com

With the movie Pixels coming out this Friday, I saw the debut as an opportunity to introduce our company to those who enjoy or enjoyed gaming in Abilene. This Adam Sandler film is about aliens misconstruing feeds of classic video games as threatening, so the extraterrestrials send arcade-faves, like Pac-Man and Donkey Kong, to destroy earth.

Epic. Just epic.

I’m planning to see the movie this weekend, so while I’m out I’ll pass out flyers about our game, hopefully letting a few interested strangers know that a video game company exists right here in town. Fingers are crossed on this one!

Another project we’re working on is an incentivized survey for our email subscribers. Sharing by word of mouth is still a crucial part of marketing, so we’re offering subscribers to choose what we do next here at RG, and we’ll do it … once we get a certain number of subscribers. This will encourage others to share the website and our work. Some of the choices include me writing a flash fiction piece involving the colonists and streaming a special Youtube video for the subscribers.

I’m always trying to learn more about my job. Therefore, I’ve been going through YouTube Creator Academy, a helpful video series that teaches the fundamentals of sustaining and popularizing a YouTube channel. Tips on titles, thumbnails, and talking to your audience are all included. For those wanting to grow an audience on this site should look over these short clips and take notes.

I’m also reading Made to Stick, a marketing book that specializes in getting people’s core ideas to stick with the public. Using the acronym SUCCESs, the authors breakdown the techniques to having good concepts being remembered. Simplicity, Unexpectedness, and Concreteness are just a few of the strategies to consider. This book can actually work for many professions and not simply marketing (teachers, I’m looking at you).

madetostick

 

Finally, Ron and I spent a little time (like two hours) writing up our target audience avatar, Caleb. This imaginary man is a representative of the people we believe will buy and enjoy our game.  It’s crucial to understand Caleb as we market our game and company. We’ll share an in-depth post on Caleb later.

Are you marketing a game now? What ideas have seemed to help? Let us know in the comments below!

 

“Checkpoint”- Week 8 Recap

Last Friday, our company let go one of our digital artist. We were saddened by the decision, but it was one that the company felt needed to be made. The RG team shared a tearful goodbye with the artist and then tried to get through the rest of the day.

This is the ugly side of business. Sometimes things just don’t work out.

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Guardian’s colony portal

Though we are one man short, we still have a dedicated team working hard on getting Guardian’s demo out by September 1st to begin our Kickstarter Campaign. Austin, our programmer, has been implementing the UI into the  game and creating the introductory missions that will advance the player through different levels. Katey, our digital artist, has nearly completed one of the most important pieces in Guardian— the colony portal. This gigantic contraption will transport humans from earth to the foreign planet by  using tremendous amounts of electricity. Because so much energy goes into this process, colonists won’t be able to come and go all willy-nilly.  The decision to populate this new world will not be an easy one.

Katey also revamped our hydroponics farm, a building that will act as a greenhouse for agriculturally-inclined colonists. More windows= more sunshine = happier plant life. (Katey will be doing a majority of the artwork from now on, except for a few graphics that will be contracted out to other artists.)

Hydroponics farm
Hydroponics farm

This last week I focused largely on finding new blogs and bloggers that are primarily interested in indie games.  From Kickstarter’s website, I searched for other indie game companies’ campaigns and saved their games’ images. After using Google image search, I found a few blogs that covered these games. Eventually, I will reach out to these bloggers in hopes that they will want to write about Guardian, too. It could be a long shot, but there isn’t any hurt in trying, either. This marketing strategy stems from Tim Ferriss’ article “Hacking Kickstarter: How to Raise $100,000 in 10 Days.” It’s a great read if you or your team are planning to do a crowdfunding project.

The RG team faced a difficult week, one that stretched us as game developers and as individuals. But a new week is upon us, and we’ve taken the time to rejuvenate, refocus, and reset our mind on the ultimate prize.

“All the Small Things” — Week Six Recap

I’m not a morning person. Before I have some swigs of highly sweetened coffee, I hardly open my eyes to acknowledge the existence of anyone or anything. And by the time I get to the office, I’ve probably growled and groaned thirteen times at helpless inanimate objects that did nothing wrong except get in my way.

These mornings continue into the Command Center, where I check and update our Follower Tracking spreadsheet. This document tracks our subscribers on YouTube and in our email system, our likes on Facebook, and our followers on Twitter. Each day since the start of Reactuate Games the total has gone up. Some days it’s 17 new people interested in what we are doing here, and sometimes it’s only 2.

Though it’s still early and my coffee hasn’t fully kicked in yet, every morning I look at our spreadsheet, I smile.

When you’re working for a company, and a humongous goal is plopped in front of you, egging you on, teasing you to catch it, the small accomplishments seem to fade in the sidelines of the race. But it’s important to celebrate these little victories, like our follower-count, too.

For example, last week RG was added to a few game developers’ lists on Twitter. When I read the notifications, I cheered at my desk, stoked that people were beginning to see us as a real game studio– a working and thriving video game company.

Now, in the world of Twitter, an addition like this may seem trivial, but I was honestly and pleasantly surprised! Of course, this whole time I believed in what we were; however, this validation from others felt good. (Yes, Momma always said not to care what others think, but this here is about marketing, and it’s all about the fans and support). Reactuate Games needed that acknowledgment … I needed us to have that acknowledgment, though it be a small one.

Screenshot 2015-07-06 13.42.05
Sam’s sandworm

Other little wins occurred last week as well. More and more graphics are emerging from the imaginary and being transferred into Guardian. Sam completed a builder unit that will construct buildings for the colonists, and he also designed a beastly sandworm (which personally reminds me of something from Starship Troopers). It’s scary for sure, and the colony’s controller will have to try his best to protect the people from this disastrous threat.

luxuryparticles
Moving particles / Luxury housing

Austin worked on particle effects for the game, as well as the construction process, which will include choosing a location to build on and having a unit construct the building. Katey also made headway by creating a luxury home model that colonists will reside in once on the new world. These skyscraping structures will help the ex-earthlings keep their extravagant and polished lifestyle while away from their native planet.

The saying holds true: it is the little things that count. And it’s the big things. And the medium-sized things. All the things count. Because with each step we take, we are farther than we’ve ever been before.

And that’s worth getting a little giddy about.

… even at 9 a.m.