Tag Archives: GUI

“What’s in a Name?”– Week 11 Recap

 

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.”

– Wm. Shakespeare


Shakespeare always applies. Even in game development.

***

I spun in my chair for what seemed like an hour as we processed the possibilities. The team and I sat in the office, mumbling words from the tops of our heads, some making good sense and others making us question our sleep depravity.

The new name of our project needs to be chosen. Time is running out, and our codename Guardian no longer fully represents our game design.

We’ve been told that the name will find us. A serendipitous lightbulb will go off, and immediately we will all know that that was meant to be our game’s name.

Others suggested we drink till something comes up — a name preferably.

While we waited on a name to emerge, plenty of other things happened last week:

Ron and I met with the owner of Abilene’s The Gathering Place, a hangout for those who love games, especially those who enjoy card games like Magic: The Gathering and Yu-Gi-Oh! . Though our audiences may vary slightly, we learned a lot from the meeting, and it’s always nice to see others who are passionate about gaming. We hope to attend the West Texas Table Top Con in San Angelo this weekend and spread the word about Reactuate Games and maybe make some friends in the process.

The Say Something Smart podcast recorded another episode, this time featuring co-founder of Nectar Game Studios, Rob Buchheit. We discussed such topics as their new game Project Resurgence, unrealistic females in video games to having “too much rhythm” for DDR. Episode 2 goes on Aug. 13th, but you can catch up on the series on our blog post, YouTube, or iTunes.

I also wrote a script and storyboarded a “happy” teaser trailer for Guardian. Reminiscent of the “Pure Michigan” commercials, this short video focuses on the touristy feel of the game. Within the next two weeks, this trailer will be released and showcase RG’s animation debut.

ColonyCams1
Colony Cams

Ron also worked on a storyboard for the “scary” teaser trailer. This video will consist of the problems that may occur in the game. We’re hoping to release this video a week after the “happy” one.

Our fearless leader is now moonlighting as a YouTube personality– sorta. His new vlog series focuses on leadership in a video game company. The first episode, entitled “What Does It Mean to Be Boss?”, is on YouTube and here.

The Kickstarter goals and rewards have been sketched out by Ron, too. Though RG’s main monetary goal has been cut, we still want to give our backers great rewards, so we all added our two cents in to what our supporters should get, and Ron created the final-ish list.

Our talented digital artist, Katey, has been hard at work on many different tasks. The Colony Cam, for instance, has come to fruition, with a rounded, futuristic appeal.

Katey also practiced rigging on her monkey, who’s been with us since day one. Now, the monkey can dance, bounce, shake, twist … everything but twerk! It’s a big accomplishment, as Katey had to watch a lot of training videos and spend a lot of time getting things into motion.

Screen Shot 2015-08-10 at 1.49.00 PM
Swarmbeast rigging

Now Katey is in the process of rigging the fearsome Swarmbeast, a monstrous alien that threatens the colonists. This creature will be featured in our trailers for the first time.

Austin focused on getting the UI elements in place and having them work properly when clicked on, including pop-ups popping up at the right time.

He also managed to get the colony cam system working, which is a huge feat for Guardian. Now, the colony cam is part of the UI, and players can see what is going on in their game at ground level. This interactive feature will hopefully appeal to players, who can now build their colony, watch it transform in real time from a colonist’s perspective, and share their world with their friends.

CamSmall

After all of this, we still don’t have a game name, but we know that our game will be awesome despite the title choose.

So, The Bard had it right after all.

 

“I Always Feel Like Somebody’s Watching Me”-Engineering Log 4

geico-kash

So who heard this song before Geico used it for their commercials?

Ok, enough of that. The end of this post will cover the feeling of being watched. Recently, Katey took her rather simple concept for a power plant and transformed it into a much more modern and interesting look. Once that was done, I took it into Unity and gave it steam billowing from its main tower and the ability to now add onto the power potential of colonies. One of the cool things about the building is to watch it be constructed and then start releasing steam once it is fully operational. The next task in regards to power is the creation of the wireless power tower (courtesy of Nikola Tesla and Katey) that sends out pulses of electricity and provides power to all buildings within its reach.

icons
Notice anything familiar about some of these icons?

In addition to new buildings, Katey has been hard at work creating new menu graphics for the UI, with some input from me. These new icons are more unified in appearance and still give the impression of what they mean (plus we left the words underneath if there is any confusion). The UI has come quite a long way from where it once was, as discussed in my last blog post.

On a similar note, I have been working to get our game utilizing the event system to manage click events. Before, if a user selected an object and then tried to use the interface, unexpected results would occur as both the click event for the UI was triggered as well as the code to check for a mouse click for the object. The goal is to hook game objects into the event system since it has a built-in way to detect and handle multiple events. This will prevent some of the unexpected results seen in some of our videos and streams. The change to using this system is taking a little bit of time to try and figure out how to convert all of the necessary methods, but it will pay off in the end.

Lastly, we are excited to begin work on a feature we think will be very interesting for players to take advantage of: Colony Cams and Colony TV. The colony cams are individual cameras/objects that are placed by the player to give unique views of their colony. menuIconsThe plan will be that these can then be hooked into channels on “Colony TV” (a website for the game) where other people can get a glimpse at the goings-on of your colony. We will limit the number of cameras a player can have at one time, but players can change camera locations at any time, and potentially even keep some around their colony to act as outposts to keep an eye out for… ah, you’ll find out later. The point is, these cameras will provide an interesting mechanic for players to take advantage of, and we are excited to start working on them.

On Friday, I was able to get two Colony Cams in place and begin work on the UI system for our cameras. Right now, a player is limited to eight camera which they can move or delete at their discretion. Unlike normal buildings, that must be built by units and can have many commands, the cameras will be managed, placed, and edited through the UI system set aside for this purpose and are simply dropped into existence. They will, however, take up space and need to be navigated around, so keep that in mind when setting up your cameras! Once I have finished hooking everything into the UI, and most likely after Kickstarter, we will be looking into getting a site set up for colony cams to be displayed. So then you can really ask “Who’s watching me?” Here is a screenshot of the UI I have so far:
CamSmall

That about wraps it up for this blog post. Check out the other Engineering Logs and stay tuned for future blog posts from us here at Reactuate Games!

Next Engineering Log:
Engineering Log 5

Previous Logs:
Engineering Log 1

Engineering Log 2
Engineering Log 3

 

“Checkpoint”- Week 8 Recap

Last Friday, our company let go one of our digital artist. We were saddened by the decision, but it was one that the company felt needed to be made. The RG team shared a tearful goodbye with the artist and then tried to get through the rest of the day.

This is the ugly side of business. Sometimes things just don’t work out.

Screen Shot 2015-07-16 at 3.24.03 PM
Guardian’s colony portal

Though we are one man short, we still have a dedicated team working hard on getting Guardian’s demo out by September 1st to begin our Kickstarter Campaign. Austin, our programmer, has been implementing the UI into the  game and creating the introductory missions that will advance the player through different levels. Katey, our digital artist, has nearly completed one of the most important pieces in Guardian— the colony portal. This gigantic contraption will transport humans from earth to the foreign planet by  using tremendous amounts of electricity. Because so much energy goes into this process, colonists won’t be able to come and go all willy-nilly.  The decision to populate this new world will not be an easy one.

Katey also revamped our hydroponics farm, a building that will act as a greenhouse for agriculturally-inclined colonists. More windows= more sunshine = happier plant life. (Katey will be doing a majority of the artwork from now on, except for a few graphics that will be contracted out to other artists.)

Hydroponics farm
Hydroponics farm

This last week I focused largely on finding new blogs and bloggers that are primarily interested in indie games.  From Kickstarter’s website, I searched for other indie game companies’ campaigns and saved their games’ images. After using Google image search, I found a few blogs that covered these games. Eventually, I will reach out to these bloggers in hopes that they will want to write about Guardian, too. It could be a long shot, but there isn’t any hurt in trying, either. This marketing strategy stems from Tim Ferriss’ article “Hacking Kickstarter: How to Raise $100,000 in 10 Days.” It’s a great read if you or your team are planning to do a crowdfunding project.

The RG team faced a difficult week, one that stretched us as game developers and as individuals. But a new week is upon us, and we’ve taken the time to rejuvenate, refocus, and reset our mind on the ultimate prize.

5 Things You’ll Learn When You’re New to Gaming

Stephanie Whitlow

Time to be honest: I work at a video game company, and I haven’t played a ton of video games. I’m what some would call a Noob. But while working at Reactuate Games, I’ve learned a lot. For example …

 

 

  1. People like to talk in three-letter terms: GUI, RTS, MMO, RPG. WTF?
conceptdraw.com
conceptdraw.com

As with most fields, knowing the jargon is essential. Whether you’re developing a game for an app or just learning to play, it’s best to figure out what some of these acronyms mean. You have a GUI (gooey), a graphical user interface, for instance, on your cell phone now. It’s the section of icons where you can tap Facebook or Pinterest. RTS or Real Time Strategy is a genre in which the player focuses on tactical solutions to conquer or defend something. Society is shortening terminology all the time, and in the gaming world, it’s no different. Here’s a pretty conclusive list of game terms to check out.

 

  1. You find out the “standard” keyboard keys for moving are W, A, S, D and not the arrows.

Some PC games call for finger-action on the keyboard, and instead of the four arrows moving the character or camera, the letters W, A, S, D do the job. Why is this a thing? Way back in ancient days, some arrow keys weren’t available on keyboards, and even if you did have them, the space between left and right hand was awkward, and you couldn’t access the space bar quickly, etc. Before you jump into a PC game, check the controls, or prepare to be killed, eaten, or, worse, look stupid in front of your friends.

 

  1. You learn there is such a thing as inverted control playing. But even after you learn that you are, in fact, inverted, it doesn’t really help you anyway.

What’s that? You’re pushing the joystick up thinking it would make the camera go down? You’re probably an inverted game player. Or a pilot. There’s a division between gamers who are inverted and those who play non-inverted controls. Neither is wrong; however, switching controllers among friends may call for extra time getting used to it if y’all are a mixed batch. Aiming is still hard regardless.

 

  1. You realize characters can become much more interesting than Mario and Luigi. No offense to them.

A pair of plumbers who wear overalls and suspiciously have a secret life fighting for a blonde princess is just the beginning of unique characters and story arcs in video games these days. Game developers are creating humorous, smart, and intriguing characters all the time– take Tiny Tina for instance. This thirteen-year-old with quick wit and a knack for blowing stuff up is a favorite in the Borderlands series because she is so unusual. Watch a montage here. Caution: she’s a mess.

tinytinawp
saynotorage.com

 

  1. AAA suddenly means more than car help.

AAA (triple A) refers to the top stars of the video game industry. These games are the ones with the highest budgets and have the most people working on their development. These types of games take a long time to create because of the high quality produced. While none of this means these particular games are the best, a lot of time, effort, and money has been put into them, and some titles, like Call of Duty, Halo, and Final Fantasy,  tend to stick out even if you’re not a big gamer. Here are some previews of the top 30 games in 2015, which may give you an idea of what AAA means.

Are you new to the gaming world? Or do you have any suggestions for new gamers? Let us know in the comments below!