Tag Archives: Agile Scrum

The RG Team does Civilization V

Last Friday for our Play & Learn we wanted to play Star Trek Online … but, unfortunately, I am inadequate at remembering passwords two minutes after I create them. So, we played Civilization V instead.

Here’s our video of the Retrospective and Play & Learn:

While Katey took over observer mode, Austin and I played. An hour of game time flew by as we established our empires, conquered brutal bandits, and waged war on Germans who didn’t want to be our friend.

Here are some pros we found for the game:

  • Animals move like real animals! We noticed that whales jumped from the surface of oceans and horses seemed to do horse-like things, too. These small details make the game play more realistic and fun.
  • Viewer mode. The observer mode that Katey was on is similar to a feature we hope to implement in our own game. Like our Colony Cam, this position allows the person to look at the game play in a new and unique way.
  • Automatically takes you to the action. This feature helps prioritize the big battles that occur during game play.
  • The mini-map is clickable. Katey could click on where she wanted to go using the mini-map. (However, she had mentioned that clicking on the users’ names would be more helpful.)

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  • Enlarged images. These large-scaled images help players understand what to do. A huge group of cattle or giant glittering minerals give players a hint at what’s supposed to take place.
  • Option to change pace. This is nice in that various personalities or gamers can play at their own speed.

And here are ALL of the cons we came up with:

  • It can get dull if pacing is too slow. Sometimes I found myself clicking “Next Turn” just because …
  • Observer can get lost. If you’re the observer, you won’t really know what’s going on with your friends. No info is available on them, and you won’t be able to see political relations. (But this may be a good feature because you certainly don’t want a spy helping out an opponent.)

Have you played Civilization V? What did you think?

Remember to join us next time when we do another Play & Learn on Twitch!

“Show and Tell” — Week Three Recap

Stephanie Whitlow

When we were six-years-old and brought that smelly, plush teddy bear to our kindergarten show-and-tell, we were utterly proud of our artifact … despite the Kool-Aid stains and bits of questionable gunk clinging to its fur. It was ours, and we loved it.  We weren’t afraid to show others our most-prized possession, even though it was flawed.

As we age, however, some of us become more self-conscious and aware of what others think of us. We learn to present ourselves to the world daily, sometimes worrying about how we come across.

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Our daily meetings are streamed live.

At Reactuate Games, we’ve chosen to film, stream, and document our entire development process from day-to-day. Our goal is to share a behind-the-scenes look at how a video game evolves, as well as the company who creates it. But as we have found out, it’s not all rainbows and lollipops inside a startup company. We have run into roadblocks and gotten embarrassed or nervous about our work, too.

We first encountered this last week. I interviewed one of our digital artists, Katey, for a clip on YouTube (You can see that awesomeness here). While editing the material, though, I became super self-conscious about my video-producing skills. At one point, the video bothered me so much I almost wanted to scrap it and re-film.

Also last week, our artists created some amazing graphics for the game (a command center, some mineral shards, a builder unit), but as with most creative products, they were first rough drafts. So rough, in fact, some questioned whether or not to show our followers.

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Mineral shards with bottom half of Command Center

The temptation to only report the good news is strong here. After all, we are representing a company. But we are much more than that at Reactuate Games. We are dreamers, and students, and gamers who are trying to create a video game that people will love and enjoy for years to come. And we want to share with others our experience.

So how do we ignore these self-conscious tendencies when we are devoted to recording the good, the bad, and even the ugly?

Ron constantly reminds the team  of what digital artist Feng Zhu says in this GDC video session (you should take a look–it’s pretty inspiring). Shown to us on week one, Zhu’s video encourages game developers and artists to not be scared of the blank canvas or making mistakes. Because if someone is scared to try things, learn, or produce imperfect work, then he/she is also afraid of progress.

Though we aim to show our successes, inevitably struggles will occur along our journey. And that’s okay. We’ll document those, too. It’s all a part of the process. Plus, we’re proud of our game and our company. Even if it does have some gunky, imperfect parts.

The Agile-Scrum Methodology

Confused about what we mean by Scrum Master? Here’s a look at how we’ll be working at Reactuate Games.

What is Agile-Scrum?

The Agile-Scrum methodology is a new workplace-development process. Using this method, employees have more say over how long it will take to complete a task, and they will get feedback more often. The Agile-Scrum system encourages frequent check-ins at Scrum Meetings so that others may help their team members when a task-problem arises.

What is a Sprint Planning?

First off, a sprint is the duration a team has to accomplish tasks. These periods of time can be a week long or longer, depending on how much work the team has on its plate. The Sprint Planning involves the product owner and the employees listing their upcoming tasks, ranging how large the tasks are, and ordering them based on priority for the company. These meetings take place on the first day of the sprint.

What is a Scrum Meeting?

A Scrum Meeting is a five-minute gathering of the team where all employees answer three simple questions:

  • What did I work on yesterday?
  • What am I doing today?
  • What is standing in my way?

It’s a time to briefly meet and check on each other and his/her progress throughout the week. Team members are also able to offer help to others by eliminating what is standing in his/her way. This speeds up work flow and promotes team building.

What is a Sprint Retrospective?

A Sprint Retrospective takes place at the end of the sprint, and it allows the staff members to discuss what each one accomplished that week. The team can also talk about what is to come in the next week.

What is a Scrum Wall? 

A Scrum Wall is a place where the team’s tasks are shown, usually on sticky notes. Three categories split the flow of production– To do, Doing, and Done. As an employee works on his task, he moves the sticky note to the corresponding slot. This technique displays the progress being done in the office and where each teammate stands on their tasks.

Who is the Scrum Master?

The Scrum Master is the MC of the Scrum meetings; however, this person does not always have to be the boss. Scrum Masters can vary daily, and everyone can end up being the scrum master at some point. The main purpose of the scrum master is to resolve any issues standing in a team member’s way.